ADA toilet faciliy reqwuired in a designated historical building

In this jurisdiction the owner of a public building is comtemplating applying to the State and have the building designated as a historical building. The question he is asking, are the tiolet facilities required to be brought into ADA/Accessibility compliance?
The CHBC,Chapter 8-6, does not have much information on this subject.

Thanks

Rick Hartley
Building Official
Original Post
SECTION 1134B
ACCESSIBILITY FOR EXISTING BUILDINGS
1134B.l Scope. The provisions of this division apply to renovation, structural repair, alteration and additions to existing
buildings, including those identified as historic buildings.

SECTION 1135B
HISTORIC PRESERVATION-SPECIAL STANDARDS OF ACCESSIBILITY FOR BUILDINGS WITH HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE
1135B.l General. Qualified historical buildings shall comply with the State Historical Building Code, Part 8, Title 24, of the California Code of Regulations.
The designation "historic building" is being misused by some business owners to excuse non compliance. We called a hotel owner who says she doesn't have to comply because her hotel was built in 1929 and is therefore historic and is "grandfathered in." Our state needs to do a much better job of informing business owners of their barrier removal obligations, before spending a lot of time passing legislation somehow blaming people with disabilities for lawsuits.

Sharon Toji
just because a building is old does not necessarily mean it is a "qualified historic structure." to qualify, it must be designated on a national, state or local register (so for your example a local designation would qualify - it does not have to be a state designation). and the SHBC technically does not apply since if there is no work being done, it is the ADA that would require making the restroom accessible. however, if the building ends up being designated, that does not excuse it from ADA compliance. it must still be made accessible unless to do so would irreparably damage historic fabric.

as sharon says this issue is often misinterpreted by building officials, architects and building owners. and there is no such thing as grandfathering, even for designated historic resources.

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