Construction Sector Embraces the iPad

Construction Sector Embraces the iPad

It’s beginning to look like Apple’s iPad might take the technologically-challenged construction sector by storm. Box.net and D7 recently teamed up on an $890 million public transportation extension in the San Francisco Bay Area using Box.net on iPads. According to Box.net:

Palo Alto-based Box.net, which provides a web-based solution that makes it easy to manage, collaborate and share content online, decided to put 20 iPads and Box accounts in the hands of D7 Consulting employees, whose job it was to ensure the waterproofing system being installed on the extension was in accordance with the project’s thousands of documents.

Then I read the NoliWhite Group, healthcare facility developers, are deploying the iPad on its projects. Everyone on the site will have access to an iPad where they can view the plans in a virtual plan room just using the Web. Documents will also be available to those who need to use and interact with them.

With everyone involved in the construction process having access to an iPad on site, we will ultimately eliminate the need to carry hundreds of sheets of drawings and thousands of pages of specifications,” says Mike Noli, partner with The NoliWhite Group. “The increased productivity level from our craftsmen and supervisors not having to carry around these massive documents alone makes this a worthwhile initiative.

The developer claims it saved $179,000 in just printing costs. But how do the rank and file builders feel about it? NoliWhite provided some perspectives in its press release. One craftsman reportedly said:

I don’t own a computer or have an email address, but the iPad is changing the way I do my work and for the better. It just makes everything so easy and fast, and I really think that it is making me better at what I do every day.

It’s too bad the company didn’t identify the “craftsman,” since that might lend some credibility to the recommendation.
Some challenges might include how visible the screen is in bright light and since it’s not a Microsoft product users will have to get used to Mac’s email. Other MS Office products covert on the fly to the Mac equivalent and can be exported back to Office, or even PDF. Most people I have heard review the keyboard have liked it, but not all. And of course, it is not impervious to damage from nail guns. Still, I bet we’re going to see this piece of hardware proliferate rapidly on construction sites.

Read More: http://constructioninformer.co...r-embraces-the-ipad/
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