Exterior Wall built 12 inches too short supporting roof trussses- This is the proposed fix- does it work?

New Single Family wood construction project. While framing this project- the exterior walls suporting the roof trusses were framed 12 inches too short (don't ask Big Grin)

This the proposal from the structural engineer to address the fix. Do you see any "specific" concerns with the detail? The 2010 CBC (2009 IBC) applies.

Thanks!

Attachments

Photos (1)
Original Post
Why is it they cannot just frame another wall up and use the lumber from the short wall elsewhere? The labor time and materials and Engineers fix fee, used to remedy this far exceed the cost of a new-framed wall, as it should have been. And the new owners need a new building not some beat it to plumb and paint it to match piece of crap. Most likely this is what the wood crafter did as their fix and was hoping the Inspector would sign it off without question.
Some thoughts.....

1) I would ask for design calcs that check the CS16 straps and nailing in the tension (tensile forces) condition at the hinge (created at the top plates of the wall).

2) The 2"x DF#2 vertical heel scab-on to truss should be provided at each side of each truss (not only on one side) to avoid eccentricity.

3) Truss manufacturer (company) should sign off and accept the changes to their trusses (as Handler pointed out). Good luck Big Grin

3) NOTE! Irregardless to the proposed fixes and with supporting engineering, the fix will not likely to eliminate movement before the straps engage. The likelihood of movement at the hinge, even with the "stiff" connection proposed by the scabs attached to the trusses (the point above the top plates) is high. This will result in unsightly cracks at the interior sheet rock and at the exterior wall cement plaster.

The home owners most likely will not appreciate the cracking ( I wouldn't) and this condition may cause legal concerns down the line. I've seen it happen before in similar situations. Eventually, it will depend on what liability the structural engineer and builder/contractor are willing to take on.

Thank you Brian Barcus.
possibly consider adding plywood sheathing on interior to heel of manufactured truss and on exterior to top of truss... this would alleviate cracking concerns and likely any hinge concerns...

I agree with prior note that 16d's at 3 into 2x are not viable...

I disagree with CHARR that this is no more expensive than re-framing a new wall... first we have no idea of the overall scope of the wall (10 feet or 300 feet long, or height), and since labor is the most expensive component, all time to demo and rebuild is lost...

there is nothing fundamentally wrong with a 'fix' as long as it's a 'proper and complete fix', is adequately robust, and functions as well as or better than the original design... if we did not take that approach, then every time there is a bust on a project mid-construction we would have to say 'tear the whole thing down and start over'... hardly a necessary or realistic scenario...

that said, of course all collateral time/cost impacts resulting from the bust must be allocated to the guilty party... (i.e. engineering, re-approvals, completion delays, flow-down impacts on the critical path and other subs, etc.)... and those costs will in most cases exceed the cost of the work and the actual/physical mitigation

hil
quote:
Originally posted by hil_CA:
possibly consider adding plywood sheathing on interior to heel of manufactured truss and on exterior to top of truss... this would alleviate cracking concerns and likely any hinge concerns... I agree with prior note that 16d's at 3 into 2x are not viable... I disagree with CHARR that this is no more expensive than re-framing a new wall... first we have no idea of the overall scope of the wall (10 feet or 300 feet long, or height), and since labor is the most expensive component, all time to demo and rebuild is lost... there is nothing fundamentally wrong with a 'fix' as long as it's a 'proper and complete fix', is adequately robust, and functions as well as or better than the original design... if we did not take that approach, then every time there is a bust on a project mid-construction we would have to say 'tear the whole thing down and start over'... hardly a necessary or realistic scenario...that said, of course all collateral time/cost impacts resulting from the bust must be allocated to the guilty party... (i.e. engineering, re-approvals, completion delays, flow-down impacts on the critical path and other subs, etc.)... and those costs will in most cases exceed the cost of the work and the actual/physical mitigation hil


Hil,
The cost to do it correct the first time is far cheaper than the cost of any fix.
A house with a wall 300 feet long is highly unlikely, that is the length of one side of a developed 5-acre parcel. If the wall is only 10 feet long then, the cost of 12 studs and one hours labor are far less than the cost of just the Engineer’s fix and keep in mind the cost of the plan check plus all the labor and materials to get it repaired and ready for inspections.

Charles

.
quote:
Originally posted by hil_CA:
charles, i understand your point... i was being more general... if it's a small scope, you are correct... but we don't have enough info to say one way or the other... my additional thoughts were how to deal with situations of this kind in general...


Hil,

If this came in for p/c as a field fix to me they would be putting in the correct studs.
I understand the general part of the question asked you have replied to it, you are correct about all of us not knowing all the reasons for the short studs on the wall. What is amazing about this is, how did the exterior walls on 1 wall become short?
If there are 8 ft. walls then the studs would be 91-1/4", a 9ft ceiling would be a 103-1/4" and so on.
It will be hard to take out the hinge in that wall without going every 4 feet and putting in a 4x member with new double top plates so they do not have to address the broken cord issue. This will get fixed most likely not as I would do it but, per an approved field fix design that will crack the drywall forever.
Thanks for the replies.
Charles

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×
×