Floor Finish in Operating Rooms

Given: I-2.1 ambulatory surgical clinic with 2 operating rooms. 2007 CBC and OSHPD 3 requirements apply.

Questions: Is the floor finish in an operating room required to be seamless? Can sheet vinyl, without welded seams, be used in an operating room? If seamless flooring is required, are there other areas in an ASC that require this finish (post-op, etc.)?

Please provide specific requirements that apply.

Thank you in advance.
Original Post
Annette;
Are you plan reviewing per OSHPD 3 or "local" authority?
If OSHPD, their policy is "seamless", there are specialty materials that are "fluid" application and meet the material sanitary requirements such as moisture absorption rate (almost too little to measure) and potential for bacteria "harbor".
For a "local" authority, the State Health Department will license the facility and has standards, call them.
What is your applicant proposing?
Hope this helps.
The original post states that OSHPD3 applies. So whatever OSHPD3 enforces would be applicable here.

I'm just surprised that the answer is not readily found in the CBC or OSHPD web site.

Maybe someone from OSHPD would step up to the plate and answer this one.
Having done ASC's in the past under OSHPD3, I don't understand why someone would be looking at something like this.

Jim's post alludes to what I would see as the main deterent to using vinyl - that the seams would eventually separate (or when tears occur) the contaminants within an OR would get a foothold and provide for very bad things to happen.

I've always specified the seamless flooring to be in the Pre-Op, Post-Op, Nurses Station, Sub-Sterile corridor, and any accessory spaces (ie. Linen and Clean-Up) off of them.
Somthing else to consider....

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Four Questions Narrow The Options For Resilient Flooring
By Lacey Muszynski, Assistant Editor
February 2009

Every organization, and every facility within every organization, have different requirements for flooring. All will expect the flooring to meet the needs of the occupants, but there are also expectations about how the flooring can affect the space.

“Commercial space is about human productivity,” says Jeff Krejsa, director of marketing, Johnsonite. “A motivating space, be it a hospital, school, corporate office, retail establishment or hotel, will contribute to greater productivity and greater return on investment for the organization.”

Realizing the greatest ROI and benefits from a hard surface or resilient floorcovering takes some research. With many factors to consider, some are bound to conflict, and that can leave facility executives with a big headache.

To avoid that pain, facility executives should weigh the options and examine the facility as much as the floorcoverings. Prioritizing the organization’s needs and wants will make the selection process easier.

“Performance, design, cost, environmental consideration — what is important to you?” says Dominic Rice, vice president of product management — commercial resilient for Armstrong. “Think about each part of your building and how it’s used, and then match the product to your budget, your maintenance requirements and the aesthetic you want to achieve.”

Here are four questions that facility executives should consider to get a better understanding of which resilient or hard surface flooring will work best.

1. How Will the Space be Used?
The obvious starting point for selecting flooring is determining what will be happening in the space. The needs of the occupants will dictate what the flooring should deliver: a combination of comfort, safety, durability and aesthetics. But it’s up to the facility executive to prioritize those factors and come up with the best flooring solution possible.

Talk to occupants of the space and examine the work they will be performing. If it’s a renovation project, ask occupants what is and isn’t working about the flooring. Facility executives will often get frank answers that will steer them in the right direction.

In other cases, the type of flooring needed will be clear. In some areas of health care, such as patient rooms and operating rooms, hygiene is of the utmost importance. It is uncommon to find anything other than sheet vinyl, especially in operating rooms, because seams in the floorcovering can be heat welded for an impervious, aseptic floor.

Other types of flooring are particularly suited to certain areas. Vinyl composition tile (VCT) is durable, long-lasting, and relatively inexpensive, and is often used in K-12 classrooms and schools. Sheet vinyl and linoleum are often used in hallways where a lot of heavy carts or equipment are rolled through because a sheet product has more “give” to wheels rolling over it. Rubber’s non-slip surface is a benefit in locker rooms, around pools, and in stairwells and kitchens. Cork, like rubber, is soft underfoot and is used where a similar aesthetic to wood is desired.

Both luxury vinyl tile and high-pressure laminate flooring are used in spaces where a natural product aesthetic is a priority, but durability is also an issue. Both feature a thin printed film just under the wear layer that gives the look of natural products with the durability of vinyl or laminate.

In spaces where comfort is a priority because occupants are on their feet a lot, such as nurse stations, the right flooring can contribute to employee productivity. Employees who are on their feet for long periods of time will be less fatigued and may even use less sick days on flooring that gives a little, like rubber or cork.

http://www.facilitiesnet.com/f...ient-Flooring--10623

See also: http://news.thomasnet.com/fullstory/22488
Healthcare applications.

Vinyl flooring is frequently used in healthcare facilities because it is nearly impervious to water, offering a significant sanitary advantage over carpeting. These characteristics are particularly important in hospital rooms, extended care facilities, nursing homes and day care centers.

Many commercial sheet vinyl floor installations offer sealed or welded seams that prevent contaminants from being lodged in the seam area. And with fewer seams than most other hard surface floors, bacteria has fewer places to hide and grow.

Disinfectant cleaners can provide a sterile surface without damaging the floor. In addition, most stains can be easily removed. Check with the manufacturer for complete maintenance instructions.

For hypersensitive populations, where mold allergies may be a problem, vinyl flooring offers advantages as well. Researchers at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas have found that carpet can produce high airborne mold counts, which can actually be aggravated by vacuuming. Vinyl flooring, on the other hand, can be cleaned without dispersing high levels of mold into the air.

http://www.vinylbydesign.com/s...ge.asp?CID=41&DID=48
The finish currently proposed at the operating rooms and post-op areas is sheet vinyl with welded seams. The owner would like to change the finish to sheet vinyl without welded seams.

After reading all of the posts, it makes sense NOT to install sheet vinyl in these areas since it can tear and separate and create areas for bacteria to grow. However, if OSHPD allows "seamless" finishes, wouldn't the sheet vinyl with welded seams be acceptable? Or is there a policy that specifically prevents sheet vinyl from being installed in certain ASC areas?

Where can someone find OSHPD's policy for the "seamless" finish in written form? Is it available on their website? I cannot seem to find it.
quote:
Originally posted by Annette:
The finish currently proposed at the operating rooms and post-op areas is sheet vinyl with welded seams. The owner would like to change the finish to sheet vinyl without welded seams.

After reading all of the posts, it makes sense NOT to install sheet vinyl in these areas since it can tear and separate and create areas for bacteria to grow. However, if OSHPD allows "seamless" finishes, wouldn't the sheet vinyl with welded seams be acceptable? Or is there a policy that specifically prevents sheet vinyl from being installed in certain ASC areas?

Where can someone find OSHPD's policy for the "seamless" finish in written form? Is it available on their website? I cannot seem to find it.


OSHPD's policy PIN 16 is attatched and also available on the web http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/FDD/Regulations/pinscans.html

If using sheet vinyl welded seams would be required in an operating room. This is in part due to the way OSHPD enforces the bases/wet cleaning requirement of CBC 1226.9.3.

In looking for appropriate design guidance I'd recommend you refer to AIA Guidelines for Design and Construction of Health Care Facilities, it's viewed as a national standard and serves as a basis for many OSHPD regulatory minimums. On this subject it requires:

5.2.2.3 Floors. Floor finishes shall be appropriate for the
areas in which they are located and shall be as follows:
(1) Floor finishes shall be cleanable.
(2) Floor finishes in areas such as clean corridors,
central sterile supply spaces, specialized radiographic
rooms, and Class A operating rooms
shall be washable, smooth, and able to withstand
chemical cleaning.
(3) Floor finishes in areas such as operating rooms,
delivery rooms, and trauma rooms shall be scrubbable,
able to withstand chemical cleaning, and
monolithic, with an integral base.
(4) All floor surfaces in clinical areas shall be constructed
of materials that allow the easy movement
of all required wheeled equipment.

I hope this helps.

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