Need resource for HVAC Code

I am listed as an "expert" on a forum, and although I state clearly that I deal only with ADA signs, I constantly get other questions! I do try to help steer these people to a good source. Here is the latest question (from California), so if anyone can tell me where to send this person for help, or would answer the question so I can pass it on, I would appreciate it!

Sharon Toji

From Jenna, California: "Hi I have 2 air conditioner units and the contractor put both drain lines into one 3 quarter inch line. This has been causing all kinds of issues of leakage through the ceiling and braking of the pipe. I was told by the AC repair man that this wasn't installed to code..the builder said if I can give them the code they would fix it...please help"
Original Post
Sharon, in my opinion the response should be "Since this is a newly installed HVAC system it should have been installed pursuant to a building permit and inspected by your local building inspector. You should contact your local building department and ask them to take a look and advise if anything is improperly installed."

If the condensate drains were not properly installed other aspects of the system may also not be code conformant. The description is vague and the comment re breaking pipes not logical - I've never heard of pipes breaking because two condensate lines were combined (or anything similar to this). What she may be trying to say is that the primary and secondary condensates were combined and there is overflowing due to a blockage in the pipe downstream??? I've seen all kinds of similar issues, including a project where the condensates were terminated in a wall behind the stucco (never daylighted) and couldn't be located except for the water discharging into the wall. As to leaking, sometimes installers will dry fit pipes - no glue or not adequate glue - and that could be a problem. Not enough info here to know what is going on.

A possibility is that the work was done without a permit... and it is also possible the work was done by an unlicensed contractor. If either is true both the contractor and the owner should be taken to task. The owner might not want to contact the BO, but 'boo hoo' if she did not get a permit (or require that this be done) just to save a few bucks). The owner might have to pay for a retroactive permit and inspections, plus a penalty. The only solace for the owner is that if the contractor was not licensed the owner can get back any monies paid for the work (total disgorgement).

hil

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