office condo's??? help!

hey all-

have an existing commercial building.
developer wants to make it condos. (5)
some of the interior walls are ther (not rated)
some are not.
i thought ICC had something regarding this (wether or not walls had to be rated?)

any thoughts would be GREAT!
Original Post
Check with a lawyer.
Legally in CA, a condo is a "vertical subdivision," which includes ownership of airspace to the inner walls, ceiling and floor surfaces of the unit. The building structure and the land are common areas owned by the property owner's association, to which all condo owners in the complex automatically belong.

The question is are there legal property lines?

If yes, Then yes.
quote:
Originally posted by M. Handler,Architect:
Check with a lawyer.
Legally in CA, a condo is a "vertical subdivision," which includes ownership of airspace to the inner walls, ceiling and floor surfaces of the unit. The building structure and the land are common areas owned by the property owner's association, to which all condo owners in the complex automatically belong.

The question is are there legal property lines?

If yes, Then yes.


well, they are going to record a condo map (legal property lines?) with the assessor.

i say fire seperation required....
however, i've seen buildings done without them.

RLGA is not the only one who shares the idea of seperation of "use", rather than seperation for distance from property line.
why the conflicting thoughts? doesn't the code specify fire resistive seperations/protected openings for distance from property line? i think a -0- lot line would require a seperation.

a recorded condo map and all....
Let's look at this from another perspective.

Where in the code does it differentiate between condominiums and apartments? The simple answer is, it doesn't.

Apartments are required to have 1-hour fire partitions, but there is nothing in the code that requires walls to have a higher fire resistance rating because of their ownership due to boundries established in the deed. They are not zero-lot-line walls.

Additionally, how would you treat the floor assembly for multiple story condos, anyway?

An R-2 occupancy is an R-2 occupancy, just like a B occupancy is a B occupancy. Ownership status does not make a difference.
In a residential setting, fire-rated walls would be required, regardless of configuration.

In a commercial setting, B occupancies are not required to be separated from B occupancies.

If it is airspace ownership, which it will be unless they provide independent footings and walls at the condo edges with an air gap between, they share a party wall but it is still considered a single building.

Since there are no legal property lines other than air, and the association owns the building proper, then unless a different occupancy is introduced there should be no need for a separation.
Likes (0)
×
×
×
×
×