What is the right way to protect this?



Hello, this is my first post.

This is a picture from 7 years ago. The landing was finished and the building was filled in with it as you see here. When it rains the little water that makes it into the landing seeps into the house around the sill level. On construction contractor said just under lap another layer of tyvek and another said tar paper. Both said tar the block. I personally was thinking tar then tyvek, but was thinking maybe it should have more. I looked through the ICC for the state of NJ and didnt come up with anything specific to my problem. I am looking for any advice good or bad regarding the right way to fix it. Pardon my inexperience with the ICC I am a landscape contractor that is redoing the landing. Thanks for anything you can provide.
Original Post
I can tell you they did not. We are pretty sure the water is not getting in at the door, but the flashing will be taken care of when we open it up. My concern is with the tyvek being below grade in this case. Is there a better way or is this acceptable. I already know they cut the tyvek too short and didnt tape it.
This is a classic example of "wicking" action created by a dry interior space drawing the moisture from the outside through the block.

Poor initial detailing is the source of your problem. The block lacking adequate flashing, french drains, moisture protection and weep provisions.

if the landing is exposed to weather have you considered building a roof over it?
thanks for the replies so far. This is a million dollar house with lots of architectural windows over the door so a roof isnt an option. We will be there to address the construction defects as we know it has plenty. The landing which is now filled with what garbage they had laying around will be replaced with a draining stone system. We know the block will be sealed. Here's the interesting part. I spoke with a Dupont engineer and they said their product is the wrong choice for the application. I agree. I would like to see ice & water shield applied to the sheathing below grade, but am also concerned that the wood should breathe some.

So ideally what I am here for is suggestions as to how to protect the below ground (in landing) sheathing.
quote:
Originally posted by Shovelracer:
thanks for the replies so far. This is a million dollar house with lots of architectural windows over the door so a roof isnt an option. We will be there to address the construction defects as we know it has plenty. The landing which is now filled with what garbage they had laying around will be replaced with a draining stone system. We know the block will be sealed. Here's the interesting part. I spoke with a Dupont engineer and they said their product is the wrong choice for the application. I agree. I would like to see ice & water shield applied to the sheathing below grade, but am also concerned that the wood should breathe some.

So ideally what I am here for is suggestions as to how to protect the below ground (in landing) sheathing.


High end custom homes here use a lot of metal flashing. Especially copper door and window pans. I assume that there is wood framing behind the Tyvek? Was the porch filled with dirt? That wood should off never been trapped behind masonry with just Tyvek to protect it, especially in a wet climate such as yours. The best solution is to provide a roof or cover over the porch. Next best is to remove the door and make a metal pan of at least galvanized sheet metal. All the seams should be soldered and the front should extend down below the bottom of the wood and lap over the concrete foundation. The side of the pan should extend up the door trimmers at least 4in and the pan should also have a lip at the inside of about 1/2in across the bottom, this creates the “pan” and any water that get passed the door, door sill or flashing would be drained to the outside. The majority of the construction defects I see are because of poor waterproofing details and the reliance of materials like Tyvek as a fix all solution. I have a saying that go with that; “its not a submarine” so lets not try to design it as one.
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